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How many and what kinds of nanomaterials-containing pharmaceuticals are known (to the Federal Government)?

There is still only a very small number of pharmaceuticals that according to the relevant admission data contain nanomaterials. Among them are drugs for:

  • treatment of tumor diseases (e.g. Caelyx, Mepact, Abraxane, Rapamune, Renagel)
  • chronic hepatitis (e.g. PegIntron, Pegasys)
  • acromegaly (e.g. Somavert)
  • multiple sclerosis (e.g. Copaxone)
  • febrile neuropathy (e.g. Neulasta)
  • Morbus Crohn (e.g. Cimzia)
  • age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (e.g. Macugen)
  • increased LDL-C values and diabetes mellitus type 2 (e.g. Welchol)
  • MRT contrast agents (in-vivo diagnostics) with iron oxide nanoparticles (e.g. Feridex)
  • parenteral iron (e.g. Cosmofer, Ferrlecit)

Besides, several authors refer to drugs containing nanoscale molecules and particles:

  • liposomes (Caelyx, Myocet)
  • polymer-protein conjugates (PegIntron, Somavert)
  • polymeric substances (Copaxone)

Source : German Bundestag, Federal printed matter 17/3771.

Are there nanoparticles in flu vaccines?

Such vaccines against flu viruses don’t contain any synthetic nanoparticles as they wouldn’t have any task. Because the contact to the antibody-producing cells is made by injecting the vaccine directly into the blood, no “fillers” are needed.

The Paul-Ehrlich Institute (in Germany) gives the following information on its website:
…..”Although some of the components are in a size range of nanoparticles, it is not about synthetic nanoparticles.”

https://www.pei.de/EN/medicinal-products/vaccines-human/influenza-flu/influenza-flu-node.html?cms_tabcounter=0

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